Answering the Call

Our industry, like many other industries, found itself in a bit of a quandary! The baby boomers who had been in leadership roles as Foreman, Project Supervisors, and Project Managers were starting to retire. This left a tremendous void in leadership.  Companies were finding this void costly and needed to fix this problem.  

The United Service Workers Local 355 Joint Apprentice Training Center was called upon to help meet these training needs. And we were able toanswer the call. We put together a two year program: Project Manager, and Foreman Advanced Training. This program covered Crew Leadership, Project Supervision, and Project Management. The results and feedback were outstanding.  We graduated seventeen future industry leaders on June 16, 2016.

These seventeen men are filling the leadership void in managing projects for the companies employing them. These companies are seeing a definite return on their investment. When a job is well-managed, morale is lifted, safety improves, productivity increases, and companies are more profitable.

We are proud of the seventeen graduates and wish them much success in all their future endeavors. The United Service Workers Local 355 Joint Apprenticeship Training Center is proud to be able to assist our signatories and answer the call.

We’re training the technicians of tomorrow, today!

FROM THE DIRECTOR’S DESK

First, I would like to wish you all a very Happy, Healthy, and prosperous New Year! Our Apprentices, Instructors, and Signatories have once again adopted a Long Island Family in need for the Holidays. I would like to personally thank everyone that did contribute to making a family in need feel the love from their neighbors at this most joyous time of year. Their contributions not only put toys under the tree (from Santa of course) but also provide some of the basic items like hats, gloves and a warm winter coat. It also provided a Christmas dinner fit for a king.


The United Service Workers Local 355 Joint Apprenticeship and Training Center has recently been authorized by the New York City Department Of Building to teach the 4-Hour Supported Scaffold User course and refresher. This course will be offered to our apprentices as well as our signatories in late January. Check your emails for dates.


The United Service Workers Joint Apprenticeship and Training Center will be opening enrollment in early February in our Sprinkler program and our Sheet Metal program. Open in enrollment will be for two weeks, so watch our website for dates. And you can always call the Training Center for information—(631) 589-5880.

Brian Keating
JATC Director

 

2015 Graduation

On June 4th, United Service Workers, Local 355, IUJAT Joint Apprenticeship Training Fund held an evening of dinner and dancing to celebrate our apprenticeship program and this year’s graduates.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THIS YEAR’S GRADUATES

GRADUATES

Mr. Eric Camporeale Steamfitter

Mr. Thomas McDonald Steamfitter

AWARDS

Patrick Butler

Instructor of the Year

Thomas McDonald

Highest Grades

Eric Camporeale

Best Attendance

BEST OF LUCK TO YOU ALL!

Photos coming soon!

THE IMPORTANCE OF APPRENTICESHIP

By definition, Apprenticeship is a discipline that combines on-the-job training with classroom related instruction to properly prepare an individual for the career of his/her choice. Keeping this in mind, no member of Local 355 or 363 can argue the fact: “The future of our industry depends upon the successful development of our apprentices.”

It is of utmost importance for me to convey to our current Journeymen how critical it is that they appreciate the vital training role they play in the development of the apprentice on the job. The JATF provides the required classroom-related instruction at our training center and, in some subject areas, can also provide exposure to jobsite work processes; but, please don’t forget what on-the-job training means—it means just that: on-the-job.

The JATF exposes the apprentice to a minimum of 1,000 hours of classroom-related instruction over the course of his/her apprenticeship. The jobsite provides the apprentice a minimum of 8,200 hours of on-the-job training over the course of his/her apprenticeship. In terms of percentages, that means that the overall development of an apprentice—in order to become a competent Journeyman—is achieved by approximately 15% exposure from classroom-related instruction and 85% exposure from on-the-job training. This difference in percentages only reinforces the fact that the interaction between the apprentice and Journeyman on the job is a crucial component to the overall success of the apprentice.

As a Journeyman you play an important role; it is your responsibility to coach, mentor, and discipline the apprentice on the job, resulting in the development of a proud, competent Journeyman. On behalf of the JATF and our apprentices, we thank you for your expetise and efforts.     

—Kevin Barry, JATF Trustee